Due date:  Friday, January 20, 2017       11:59pm

Credit:  25 pts.

 

First, in true (what really IS true, anyway?) existential form, define your existence by posting a question for your classmates to answer related to the reading/research about existentialism that you have conducted the last several days.  This is a question that your classmates can answer to show THEIR understanding of the term and to reflect their personal beliefs on the discussion topic.

Secondly, after all questions have been posted, choose TWO (2) to which to respond.  Respond completely, sincerely, and effectively.

Thirdly, as the writer of the question, react to those bloggers who have responded to your question.  Indicate whether the blogger has understood the concepts you are referencing and decide if the blogger’s answer is a valid one.

Advertisements

39 thoughts on “AP-Existentialism post

    1. impocalypse

      Honestly I would have done the same thing, because I would never be able to live with myself as a free man with a dead man’s family grieving

      Reply
    2. impocalypse

      Honestly I would have done the same thing, because I would never be able to live with myself as a free man with a dead man’s family grieving

      Reply
    3. mccordlynsey

      If I was in the prisoners shoes, I like to think that I would turn myself in. I don’t actually know if I could, but that if I ever killed someone, I don’t think I could live with the guilt. I completely understand why the prisoner turned himself in, and I like to think that since it was the right decision, it makes up for his murder, but only slightly. Although, I do think he still deserved to be punished and face the consequences.

      Reply
      1. jeannarussell

        Lynsey, I agree with you. I think that the right thing to do is turn yourself in. I also agree that he does deserve to be punished.

      2. jst222

        In the beginning I first turn towards freedom, but in the end I would find myself turning to justice as I value morals above the freedom that I could find.

  1. mccordlynsey

    Do you think that Daru made the right decision in letting the Arab go? What would you have done in the same situation? Why?

    Reply
    1. jeannarussell

      I think that Daru should not have let the prisoner go. The prisoner killed a man and should be punished for his actions. If I was in Daru’s situation, I would have turned the prisoner in because I would be to scared to let him go. I would be worried that the police or government would come after me for not turning in the prisoner.

      Reply
      1. mccordlynsey

        I agree that the prisoner deserved to be punished but can guilt be punishment enough? We know that the prisoner feels guilt. We know that he was driven by harsh circumstance and that is why he killed his cousin. So, since it wasn’t Daru’s job to deliver the prisoner, why is he morally responsible for punishing the prisoner? Daru empathizes and hold himself responsible for his own morals. I like to think that I could do that too, but I would probably be too afraid to defy the government/ orders. Daru is braver than I am though.

      2. jeannarussell

        Daru is not responsible for sending in the prisoner. However, Daru may face consequences for not turning in the prisoner.

    2. allidunk

      Yes, and I would have done the same thing. The Arab did kill a man which is awful so he should defiantly be locked up. But at the same time the Arab felt bad about killing his cousin so that means he has morals. These morals mean that the man was most likely to lock himself up. So Daru made the right decision in letting the man turn himself in as opposed to that of a prisoner, allowing the man to keep some of his pride. Daru did the right ting because now the Arab can live with the fact that he made the right choice and Daru does not have to live with the guilt of essentially killing a man.

      Reply
      1. mccordlynsey

        I like this. Daru allows the prisoner to make one last right decision for himself after being imprisoned probably before actually being help prisoner. I completely agree.

    3. madyford

      I think that Daru did make the right decision in letting the prisoner go. No matter if he turned him in or let him go, there were people that were going to come after him. I think that Daru is doing the same thing as the man who brought the prisoner to him did. He shifted the responsibility to Daru, and now Daru is shifting responsibility to the prisoner to determine whether he is imprisoned or not for his actions. If I were in Daru’s shoes, I do not think I would be able to let the man go. I would be quick to judge this man as a murderer and want him in jail. Daru kept a weapon with him because he was uncertain of how the prisoner would act. I, too, think my judgement would get the best of me, and I would not be able to trust my “guest”. In the end, Daru realizes that the prisoner is only human, and, as an existentialist, the author wants the reader to realize that this prisoner will be the result of his choices and circumstances, I think. :/

      Reply
      1. mccordlynsey

        That is a good point. Maybe Daru isn’t being completely selfless and brave but trying to pass control of the situation so no guilt or blame can fall on him.

  2. impocalypse

    Existentialism is a vast school of thought with many different classes and thoughts. The big three of these is Nihilism, Absurdism, and Existentialism itself. Of these three, which do you most identify as and if none, why?

    Reply
    1. cbrayant

      I think if you believe in a high power, such as God, it prompts you to live a moral life. Because you believe in the religion, you live a life that follows the morals and ideas of the Bible. You live to please God.

      Reply
      1. madyford

        Your response then makes me wonder if existentialist thinkers and believers trust their own judgement, or if they believe in some type of higher power. I think I would have to agree that the idea of a higher power, even for existentialists, would be what leads one to live a moral life. If one does not live with a God leading them, what then do they believe in? If they lead themselves and determine for themselves what they believe to be morally right and wrong, they would be their own God. This, then, would be (even to an existentialist philosopher) a flawed way of living and morally wrong because they believe that humans are flawed and will mess up. I think existentialism is just belief in the human condition. We determine our existence, and we live accordingly, trying to do what we see as right and wrong and benefits us. Personally, I see myself as an imperfect being with the capacity to mess up. Consequently, I believe and put my trust in a higher power. It is almost like it was my existential decision to believe in the God of the Bible so I wouldn’t have to be my own god and face the consequences of my mistakes.

    2. mccordlynsey

      I do think that existentialism leads people to live a moral life. Believing that there are consequences to actions holds people responsible and allows them to be moral beyond what is socially accepted. People who do not believe that their life has no meaning or that there are no consequences do not have that extra drive to do good in the world. Existentialists are way more likely to make the most good out of their life, and in my opinion, that makes those people more likely to be moral in life.
      p.s. I really like your question!

      Reply
      1. madyford

        I agree with you that existentialism could lead to a moral life because it states that humans are a product of their choices. You would think that existentialism would lead one to want to make good choices. This is true for some. They see unselfish love and understanding as the most fulfilling way of life and this leads them to live a life on what they see as morally good. However, some existentialist philosophers don’t believe that doing what society considers as morally right is what you may find morally right. This is what makes this school of thought so gray. I think it only leads one to a moral life by their standards, and this is why this train of thought leads to people who live for pleasure and selfish reasons.

    3. jeannarussell

      I don’t really think existentialism prompts one to live a moral life. I think that people live a moral life because of the way they are raised and their background. If a child is raised with morals created by their parents I think that they are more likely to continue a moral life. However, I do believe that everyone has a choice to live a moral life. That child can choose to go kill someone and forget their morals, but they also have a choose to continue with their morals.

      Reply
      1. madyford

        This sort of brings up the idea that humans are not born with an innate sense of morals, but that they have them taught to them, either by family, background, or society. I like how you changed the choice of “is this right or wrong” to “do I forget my morals, or do I choose to act on them”. Existentialism is a very gray area, but I think it can be interpreted into its own set of morals based on what one personally believes as right, despise what one has been taught. I agree, however, that if we are taught a certain set of morals, we might be partial to them in our own life.

    4. carleyshepard

      It prompts people to live a moral life to their own standards. But what they find to be morally sound may not be what you think is morally sound. So even if you find what others are doing wrong, they believe that they are dong what is right. So, yes, it does prompt a moral life, it just may not seem like it at all times.

      Reply
      1. madyford

        I agree with you completely. I think existentialism leads one to act on morals that they create for themselves based on how they perceive their existence and their place in the universe.

  3. cbrayant

    Cassidy Question- How has existentialism made an impact? On society? Politics? What difference has it made in the modern world?

    Reply
  4. impocalypse

    Zech’s question- Existentialism is a vast school of thought with many different classes and thoughts. The big three of these is Nihilism, Absurdism, and Existentialism itself. Of these three, which do you most identify as and if none, why?

    Reply
    1. jst222

      The school of Existentialism that align with my beliefs is Existentialism itself. Existentialism states that each human has the ability to make their own decisions, that all are governed a higher moral code, and values personal freedom. These are all things that I value. I believe that there is a purpose to all things and all people, excluding me from the other schools of existentialism.

      Reply
    1. cbrayant

      Teachers are educators and mentors. They instill morals and good behavior in children. It showed that he had some kind of morals and was a good person. Not many teachers have bad morals, they would not get hired to mentor children if did.

      Reply
      1. allidunk

        Now that is an interesting theory. Daru is teaching the readers existentialism therefore he is a teacher. Cool! I like it.

    1. impocalypse

      He was more of an absurdist, because instead of taking everything up with some higher power like many people would likely do, he instead decided to leave everything up to just random chance by letting the prisoner go. Daru did not care if the prisoner went to jail or if he escaped, he only cared for him to leave.

      Reply
    2. madyford

      I think Daru was more of an existentialist because he left the prisoner to choose his path and determine what his fate would be. Daru sees himself as having no place to determine whether this man should or should not face the consequences of his actions. I also think that because the author bases Daru on his own ideas on existentialism, that his character probably leans more towards existentialism.

      Reply
  5. jaceyann

    Jacey’s Question: Why do you think the Philosophy of Existentialism begins with “the existential attitude?” Why are the words such as “confusing, absurd or meaningless” included in this point to explain the world? What affects do these words have on the reader?

    Reply
  6. jst222

    In the school of Existentialism, there are many philosophers. Of these whose work aligns most closely to your beliefs?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s